4 types of campaign integration: Which one's most effective for which goals?


The analysis identified four types of integration in campaigns:
1. No integration where a campaign either used a single advertising channel or took a laissez faire approach to merging
channels.
2. Advertising-led integration around a common creative platform. This ranges from visual identity only -the so-called ‘matching luggage’ approach – to a full-scale advertising creative idea across multiple disciplines, including non-advertising channels.
3. Brand idea-led orchestration where there was unification around a shared brand concept or need-state platform. Within this segment, the creative work does not look united by a common advertising idea, yet the audience is able to decode the strands as part of one brand’s message.
4. Participation-led orchestration where the goal between brand and audiences is to create a common dialogue, co-creation, experience or ‘conversation’.






Interesting:
- Not-integrated campaigns don't turn out to be as ineffective as one usually assumes. In fact, they are just as effective in terms of hard business objectives (sales, market share, etc.) as the 3 remaining types of integration on average. Integration rather seems to pay-off on the soft objectives level (fame, likeability, etc.).
- The  campaigns integrated by a "Big Brand Idea" seem to be most effective.
- Participation-lead campaigns are rather effective for market share defenders and rather in terms of (re-) creating fame. The main reasons for that: they tend to engage existing customers and often have to rely on pre-existing brand love.

But let's not forget - the results above stem from an analysis of campaign effectiveness with no direct implications for communications that cannot be categorised as campaigns.